About Jasmine May

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So far Jasmine May has created 389 blog entries.

Jamye Wisecup Scholarship Request

2024-02-23T19:17:02+00:00

In 2019, the Jamye Wisecup Memorial Scholarship Fund was established to honor Jamye’s memory. For those who did not have an opportunity to work with her during the years she was an emergency manager in Clallam County, she was the heart and soul of emergency management in her community and made an impact on many people’s lives. Jamye was a Board Member with our Center for many years and her dedication to promote emergency preparedness and her genuine caring for everyone made her exceptional. Peninsula College and the Center Advisory Board have worked together for the past five years to [...]

Jamye Wisecup Scholarship Request2024-02-23T19:17:02+00:00

Resilient Management – What’s in our future

2024-02-23T02:51:43+00:00

Resilient Management – What’s in our future “Seizing the momentum to build resilience for a future of sustainable inclusive growth” - (The resilience agenda, developed by the World Economic Forum it the first serious program to coordinate long-term solutions throughout our disrupted world. People, education, and organizational resilience: Organizations need to become more flexible to adjust to economic changes. De-centralized leadership model. Cultivates talent and self-sufficient teams. Invest in education to address the need new skills, upskilling, reskilling existing workforce. (The following information provided by: Cheyene Marling – Center Advisory Board Member and Managing Director of Talent Management & Research [...]

Resilient Management – What’s in our future2024-02-23T02:51:43+00:00

Whodunnitt!

2024-02-23T02:10:40+00:00

WHODUNNITT! By Jim Mullen I have observed the renewal of a “debate” of sorts that seems to preoccupy some emergency management academics and practitioners: aren’t most disasters man- made and not ”natural?” -an interesting proposition if there weren’t more pragmatic concerns for emergency managers. We could trace our problems all the way back to the Original Sin, but I prefer focusing on mitigating our hazard vulnerabilities. Speaking recently to University of Washington graduate students about hazard mitigation, I described Seattle Project Impact’s (SPI) success at illuminating the benefits of confronting known hazards (earthquake in Seattle) through a grass roots, whole-community [...]

Whodunnitt!2024-02-23T02:10:40+00:00

Women in Leadership Symposium 2024

2024-02-22T20:39:43+00:00

This year's symposium will center around the importance of fostering robust and dynamic relationships and partnerships with women in Resilience Management and associated fields

Women in Leadership Symposium 20242024-02-22T20:39:43+00:00

The Rocky Road Ahead

2024-01-29T23:05:50+00:00

The Rocky Road Ahead Emergency Management Once Removed January 31, 2023 By Jim Mullen “Wake me up when it’s all over, when I’m wiser and I’m older…” * Emergency managers (state and local) may be excused for feeling this way during most election years, when relatively minor incidents can suddenly become HUGE, with the executive’s staff reacting/often overreacting to events that in another year might have gone unnoticed. It’s not unusual, particularly in election years, to have to explain (patiently, and multiple times)to executive -level staff the sometimes-tedious bureaucratic pace of the disaster approval process for a presidential declaration that [...]

The Rocky Road Ahead2024-01-29T23:05:50+00:00

The Blame Game

2024-01-16T20:34:30+00:00

The Blame Game Emergency Management Once Removed January 16, 2023 By Jim Mullen Major disasters occur all the time, usually resulting in inquiries about the degree of advance warning, or the level of preparation of authorities for a worst-case scenario.  “Blame” most often accompanies catastrophic events when perceptions are that readiness or critical decision-making was deficient.  In the subsequent rush to judgment, the “blame” is frequently misplaced, or at least not shared proportionately. Emergency managers can relate; they are often the first to be offered up for criticism when things go wrong. A friend with considerable expertise in the public [...]

The Blame Game2024-01-16T20:34:30+00:00

The Earth is “Illin”

2023-12-19T18:42:06+00:00

The Earth is "Illin" Emergency Management Once Removed December 19, 2023 By Jim Mullen Last May the Associated Press reported that a study by the international Earth Commission (our planet’s annual “wellness check”) suggests that Planet Earth has entered the danger zone with respect to climatic impacts on “phosphorus and nitrogen contamination of water from fertilizer overuse, groundwater supplies, fresh surface water, the unbuilt natural environment and the overall natural and human-built environment” – happily (I guess!) the study concluded that air pollution has not quite reached a similar danger point. The study reflects the conclusion of reputable scientists, whose [...]

The Earth is “Illin”2023-12-19T18:42:06+00:00

Beware of “MDM”

2023-11-21T18:23:09+00:00

In this final summary of the recent annual forum of the National Emergency Management Association held in Memphis, Tennessee in October, I found most compelling the panel discussion entitled “Combating Contested Information During Disaster Response and Recovery” addressed the emerging threat of what is called “MDM”: meaning Misinformation, Dis-information, and Mal-information.

Beware of “MDM”2023-11-21T18:23:09+00:00

More AI – from the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) Annual Forum, October 2023

2023-11-02T17:42:25+00:00

A follow- up to my recent post (“A Thought about Taking the AI Plunge”) on the risk/reward associated embracing artificial intelligence comes from the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) October 2023 forum panel discussion on this subject.

More AI – from the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) Annual Forum, October 20232023-11-02T17:42:25+00:00

A Thought About Taking the AI Plunge

2023-10-19T23:13:10+00:00

The rising angst over the apparent advance in artificial intelligence, or AI, called to mind the limerick (“Daisy…” etc.) that HAL, the state-of-the-art computer in the film “2001, A Space Odyssey” was reduced to repeating when HAL’S human soul mate (Dave) attempted to unplug him/it (?). HAL survived, but it did not go well for “Dave”.

A Thought About Taking the AI Plunge2023-10-19T23:13:10+00:00
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